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Latin-English Translation Forum

This is the place to post your translation requests in English or Latin and to help others with your skills and knowledge. Important: Always give the context of your enquiry!
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Term:
Translation for Halloween Project » answer
by Jerry O, yesterday, 23:35  Spam?  74.76.98....
Hello,

I am putting together a Halloween project and I need some help with an English to Latin translation.

According to Google Translate, "voice of the dead" translates to "vox mortis."

A confirmation or correction of the translation would be much appreciated.

Thank you in advance,
Jerry O
Chat:    
by Jerry O, yesterday, 23:41  Spam?  74.76.98....
 #879011
Sorry, translation was "vox mortuis" (spellcheck strikes again!)
Term:
Latin translation  » answer
by simikothari, 2017-09-17, 08:04  Spam?  24.6.28...
Hi,

I would like to know the Latin meaning of Verum ad te in English.
I am looking for the Latin way of saying of " Be true to yourself".
But when i translate " verum ad te" back in english it means " but you"
Pls help and let me know how to say " be true to yourself" in Latin.
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-17, 11:38  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878828
Verum ad te - Means "(That thing is) true for you".

Verus/Vera (Man/Woman) tibi es - Means "Be true to yourself" in Classic Latin. If you want a more modern Latin, change "tibi" to "teipsum".

PS: "But when i translate..." if you are using Google Translate, don't believe its translations. They are horrible. Google Translate for Latin only works -sort of- with single words.
Answer:
Latin Translation  #878852
by simikothari, 2017-09-17, 20:05  Spam?  24.6.28...
Hi ,
I don't want this from a women or man's perspective . So how will I say this in Modern Latin-  " Be True to yourself".
I didn't understand your above interpretation of man/women.

also I found out this on google yesterday , don't know how relevant is this? " exsiste verum ad te ipsum"

Please let me know.
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-17, 20:13  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878853
Latin is a gendered language, when you say the adjective "true" you need to adapt it if you are saying it to a man or a woman.

You can use "verum" is the neuter gender.
Answer:
Latin Translation  #878854
by simikothari, 2017-09-17, 20:18  Spam?  24.6.28...
So, Verum is neuter Gender your saying. So how will I say  " Be true to yourself" , using verum in it.

Also  " exsiste verum ad te ipsum"- is this correct and what does this mean in LATIN.
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-17, 21:10  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878857
"Verum tibi es" or "Verum teipsum es"

"Exsiste verum ad te ipsum" means "Exist true towards yourself".
Term:
Need an accurate translation for a tattoo please! » answer
by Mythologies, 2017-09-17, 07:56  Spam?  76.114.142....
"I was left in the darkness, so the darkness I became" Could I please get an accurate translation of this quote please, been trying to get this translation for months for a new tattoo but keep getting different answers,
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-17, 11:51  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878830
- In tenebris relictus/relicta (male/female) sum itaque tenebras factus/facta (male/female) sum

"Relictus/a sum" means "I was left behind", you can change it to "Derelictus/a sum" which means "I was forsaken/abandoned" or "Desertus/a sum" which means "I was left" (in the sense "I deserted").
Term:
Translation » answer
by Me122, 2017-09-12, 03:08  Spam?  203.33.161...
I would like to get this translated: "Do not read the latin"

The meaning I am trying to convey is an instruction to not read latin aloud ... think, the supernatural horror movie where the characters find an old book in a locked room and sound out the latin phrases, summoning summon demons, spirits and the like.
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-12, 11:25  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878433
The usual verb for "to read" is legere, but there is one verb for "to read aloud" which is recitare. But legere was very much used so I think someone would choose it so people doesn't make a (deadly) mistake.

I'll provide sentences with both verbs, so you can choose.

- Linguam Latinam noli legere/recitare
- Linguam Latinam ne legeris/recitaveris
- Lingua Latina, non legitur/recitatur - This one is "It is Latin, it's not meant to be read/read aloud"
Term:
Can someone help with a translation please? » answer
by Purrdita (UN), 2017-09-03, 18:34  Spam?  
The phrase I wish to translate is, HAPPY BIRTHDAY, TO THE GOLDEN BOY, WHO IS NOW LOST.

Through on-line translators I've cobbled this together?

FELIX NATALIS, AUREA PUER, QUI NUNC EST, PERDIDIT.

Can anyone perhaps clarify this for me?  I'd be most grateful, thanks!
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-09-05, 15:08  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #878001
You did a great job only with on-line translators. But I'd think it should be:

FELIX NATALIS, AUREO PUERO, CUI NUNC AMISSUS EST.

I changed the verb because "perdidit" means "he destroyed", "he ruined".
Answer:
by Purrdita (UN), 2017-09-07, 10:06  Spam?  
 #878118
Thanks so much!!  Really appreciated. :-)
Term:
help.. » answer
by nona_rona_lisa, 2017-09-03, 17:22  Spam?  76.78.227...
Trying to say "I love this shirt greatly!. You are able to see my tummy but its nothing." so far i have "Hoc camisam plus amo! Mea alvum sed est nihil potes videre."
Term:
help? » answer
by Nona-Rona-Lisa (US), 2017-09-03, 06:17  Spam?  
trying to say "when i think of us i become full of joy" so far i have "Cum nostri cogito absortam fio laetitiā."
Term:
How am I doing? » answer
by Nona-Rona-Lisa (US), 2017-08-21, 13:09  Spam?  
I'm trying to write "i hate to run but i would love to swim with you" so far i have "Odi curere sed amabo natare cum te."
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-08-22, 07:48  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #876917
It's "currere", not "curere". Your sentence is right, although "amabo" means "I'll love". For "I'd love" is "amem" (Subjunctive).

Currere odi sed natare cum te amem.
Term:
Engraved sword wedding gift » answer
by Jenh, 2017-08-17, 21:38  Spam?  192.207.21...
I want to engrave
"My hero, my protector, my love"
On a sword for my future husband as a wedding gift. I just want to make sure google translate doesn't mess me up. Thank you.
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-08-18, 16:53  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #876702
"Heros, protector, amator meus"

Meus is "my", you can write it after each noun (heros meus, etc.) if you like it. But it isn't necessary in Latin.

Because it's for an engraving, perhaps it would be cool to write as they would have done it in Roman times:

HEROS·PROTECTOR·AMATOR·MEVS

(Only capital letters, no spaces, only a point · and v and u are the same letter).

Enjoy your wedding!
Chat:    
by Jenh, 2017-08-23, 18:46  Spam?  192.207.21...
 #877027
Thanks for the help. I think I will use that. I am also going to put his last name and our wedding date. Do you have a recommendation for how to write 9/23/17 or September 23, 2017?
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-08-23, 19:25  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #877032
In New Latin it would be:

Septembris, 23, a.2017
23 Sep. 2017

In the Classical Roman calendar it was:

a.d.IX kal. Oct. MMXVII

...which is too complicated.

Sep. 23, 2017 looks nice.
Term:
Empower translation » answer
by alisamfontes, 2017-08-11, 21:20  Spam?  70.73.20...
Looking to get the latin word for 'empower' tattooed on me, and I need it to be accurate. any help would be great :)
Term:
quote help needed! » answer
by Nona-Rona-Lisa (US), Last modified: 2017-07-31, 19:41  Spam?  
I'm trying to say "Don't cry because it ended, smile because it happened" in latin. I tried by myself and came up with "Non lacrima quod terminat subride quod contigit"
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-08-02, 14:56  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #875372
You did well, although your starting words aren't an imperative "Don't..." but something like "No teardrop...".

My version: "Ne ploraveris quod finivit, subride quod evenit".
Term:
Please help! English -> Latin » answer
by KassieV, 2017-07-05, 01:56  Spam?  207.228.78....
Please help! Can someone translate the following to Latin for me?  It's for a school project. Thank you in advance!

"I think we ought to live happily ever after."
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-07-05, 21:08  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #873619
Credo nos feliciter victurus esse in aeternum,
Chat:    
by KassieV, 2017-07-05, 22:28  Spam?  198.161.4...
 #873622
Thank you!!!
Term:
Can someone help me translate this latin phrase please » answer
by need help, 2017-07-04, 20:28  Spam?  76.126.46...
isti, cum eos testibus arripueris, et mente et animo mox capientur
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-07-05, 21:12  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #873620
Those you seize by the testicles have immediately their minds and souls caught.

Or more natural: You have the mind and the soul of those you seize by their testicles.

I think I remember reading this in Little Gods by Terry Pratchett.
Term:
translation for a school display » answer
by cryer (UN), 2017-07-04, 16:57  Spam?  
Is anyone able to help me translate "Today's Fun" into Latin? My class will be studying the Romans and I wanted to write it under our daily agenda. Thanks for any help
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-07-04, 18:17  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #873547
Fun of today:
Hodierni oblectatio
Hodierni ludus

Today is fun:
Hodie oblectatio (est)
Hodie ludus (est)
The est (it is) isn't necessary
Answer:
Thank you :)  #873548
by cryer (UN), 2017-07-04, 18:34  Spam?  
Term:
Mistake in the answer key? » answer
by BrennaB (UN), 2017-07-02, 20:25  Spam?  
Can't tell if this is an errata or I'm just misunderstanding something grammatically. The translation given for the English phrase "[given] four rewards to this man" is "quattuor praemia viro huic."

Why is "praemia" in the nominative singular instead of accusative plural?
Answer:
by khanzat, 2017-07-03, 12:36  Spam?  80.49.67....
 #873429
Praemia is in the accusative plural. It's a neuter noun of the second declension (praemium).

I don't think you should be translating before knowing by heart the 5 declensions.
Answer:
by BrennaB (UN), 2017-07-03, 22:57  Spam?  
 #873482
Thank you; I was working on this late at night and had forgotten that praemia was a neuter noun and not feminine. Whoops!

The textbook I'm working through has translation exercises in each chapter, so I'm not sure how I could avoid those. It only recently introduced fourth and fifth declension nouns.
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